Spring 2015 Contributors

Below you can find information on the contributors for the Spring 2015 issue of the Newsletter. This issue is currently available to members of APSA's Comparative Politics Section and will be available to nonmembers in Fall 2015. Become a member today.

 | Symposium | Special Topic | Dataset | 

Symposium: Studying Sensitive Political Phenomena

Jesse Driscoll

Jesse Driscoll is an Assistant Professor at the School of International Relations and Pacific Studies at the University of California, San Diego. He received his Ph.D. in 2009 from Stanford University and was a Post-Doctoral Academy Fellow at the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies. He has conducted extensive fieldwork in the Former Soviet Union, and is currently overseeing a number of research projects looking at how individuals living in conditions of acute insecurity respond to survey questions about their behavior. His work has appeared in the Journal of Conflict Resolution, Research and Politics, and the Journal of Survey Statistics and Methodology. His book Warlords and Coalition Politics in Post-Soviet States is forthcoming from Cambridge University Press. His research has been funded by the National Science Foundation.

David Laitin

David Laitin is the James T. Watkins IV and Elise V. Watkins Professor in the Department of Political Science at Stanford University. He conducts research on political culture, ethnic conflict, and civil war, and his field expertise spans Somalia, Nigeria, Catalonia, Estonia and France. His research has been published in all of the discipline's leading journals. He has also published books with Cambridge University Press and Oxford University Press. He has been a recipient of fellowships from the Howard Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation, the Guggenheim Foundation, and the Russell Sage Foundation. He is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences. More information can be found at his website.

Graeme Blair

Graeme Blair is a pre-doctoral fellow at Columbia University through Experiments in Governance and Politics and the Earth Institute. He will receive his Ph.D. in 2015 from Princeton University and will be an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at UCLA from 2016. His research examines both why civilians support armed groups and why groups living near valuable assets like oil fields are often able to force the state to make policy concessions and fiscal transfers. In addition, he has developed new methods for sensitive survey questions. His work has appeared in the American Political Science Review, the American Journal of Political Science, and Political Analysis. He also won the 2013 Pi Sigma Alpha Award for best paper at Midwest Political Science Association. More information can be found at his website and on his Google scholar profile.

Daniel Gingerich

Daniel Gingerich is an Associate Professor in the Department of Politics at the University of Virginia. He also directs the Quantitative Collaborative, a University-wide institute designed to disseminate new advances in the quantitative social sciences and foster greater interdisciplinary collaboration. He received his Ph.D. in 2007 from Harvard University. His research focuses on understanding the causes and consequences of corruption and clientelism in Latin America and the Caribbean, as well as on developing new methodologies to study these phenomena. He has published articles in journals such as the British Journal of Political Science, Political Analysis, and the Quarterly Journal of Political Science. He is the author of Political Institutions and Party-Directed Corruption in South America: Stealing for the Team, published by Cambridge University Press in 2013. His research has been funded by the National Science Foundation. More information can be found at his website.

Elizabeth C. Carlson

Elizabeth C. Carlson is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science and the Program on African Studies at The Pennsylvania State University. She received her Ph.D. in 2011 from the University of California, Los Angeles
and has held pre- and post-doctoral fellowships at Stanford and Yale. She uses survey and experimental methods to study political behavior and citizen preferences in new African democracies, as well as how citizen behavior shapes government performance and accountability. Her work is forthcoming in World Politics and has been funded by the National Science Foundation. She is a member of Experiments in Governance and Politics. More information can be found at her website and on her Google scholar profile.

Vineeta Yadav

Vineeta Yadav is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at The Pennsylvania State University. She received her Ph.D. in 2007 from Yale University. Her research focuses on the effects of institutions on economic development, with a particular emphasis on how institutions influence lobbying, corruption, and judicial empowerment. In addition to several articles, she has also published two books. The first, Political Parties, Business Groups, and Corruption in Developing Countries was published by Oxford University Press in 2011. It received the 2012 Best Book award from APSA’s Political Parties and Organizations Section, the 2011 Rosenthal Book Award from the APSA’s Legislative Studies Section, and an Honorable Mention for the 2012 Best Book award from the APSA’s Comparative Democratization Section. Her second book, Democracy, Electoral Systems and Judicial Empowerment in Developing Countries, was recently published in 2014 with Michigan University Press. A third book, Corruption in Dictatorships, is forthcoming with Cambridge University Press. She is currently working on two new research projects. The first examines the origins of commercial courts and their effect on economic development and civic rights. The second looks at how the evolution of political learning and support influences institution building and democratic consolidation. More information can be found at her website and on her Google scholar profile.

Special Topic: The Ethics of Field Experiments in Comparative Politics

Scott Desposato

Scott Desposato is an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of California, San Diego. Before coming to San Diego, he was an Assistant Professor at the University of Arizona, a Harvard Academy Scholar, and a Research Fellow at Princeton University. He received his Ph.D. in 2001 from the University of California, Los Angeles. His general research interests include democratic institutions, campaigning, mass behavior, and political methodology. Specific projects have examined redistricting in the United States, electoral rules and federalism in Brazil, party-switching by politicians, and statistical methods for studying legislatures. His work has appeared in the discipline's leading journals such as the American Journal of Political Science, the American Political Science Review, and the Journal of Politics. In 2013, he organized the NSF-funded Ethics in Comparative Politics Experiments Conference. More information can be found at his website and on his Google scholar profile.

Dataset: GROWup

The GROWup federated data platform provides management and access to disaggregated, integrated, spatially explicit, and user-friendly conflict-related data.

Nils-Christian Bormann

Nils-Christian Bormann is a post-doctoral researcher in the International Conflict Research (ICR) group at ETH Zurich. Prior to taking his position with the ICR, he was a visiting researcher at the University of Pittsburgh's Department of Political Science, where he was funded by a DocMobility Grant from the Swiss National Science Foundation. He received his Ph.D. in 2014 from ETH Zurich. His research interests include ethnic coalitions and power-sharing, civil wars, ethnic conflict, democratization, electoral rules, and spatial methods. His work has appeared in Electoral Studies. More information can be found at his website.

Manuel Vogt

Manuel Vogt is a post-doctoral researcher in the International Conflict Research (ICR) group at ETH Zurich. He received his Ph.D. in 2013 from ETH Zurich. For the past five years, he has managed the EPR-ETH dataset and coordinated the two updates of the dataset. His research interests include ethnic conflict, (post-conflict) democratization, electoral institutions and party systems, and Latin American and African politics. His work has appeared in Latin American Politics and Society and in several edited volumes. More information can be found at his website.

Lars-Erik Cederman

Lars-Erik Cederman is a Professor of International Conflict Research in the Center for Comparative and International Studies at ETH Zurich. Before coming to Zurich, he was an Associate Professor at Harvard University, an Assistant Professor at the University of California, Los Angeles, and a University Lecturer and Fellow at Somerville College, Oxford University. He received his Ph.D. in 1994 from the University of Michigan. His research interests include computational modeling, international relations theory, nationalism, integration and disintegration processes, and historical sociology. He has published articles in journals such as the American Political Science Review, International Organization, and Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. More information can be found at his website and on his Google scholar profile.