Spring 2016 Contributors

Below you can find information on the contributors for the forthcoming Spring 2016 issue of the Newsletter. This issue will be available to members of APSA's Comparative Politics Section in Spring 2016 and to nonmembers in Fall 2016. Become a member today.

Symposium: Data Access and Research Transparency (DA-RT)

Ben Ansell

Ben Ansell is a Professor of Comparative Democratic Institutions in the Department of Politics and International Relations at Oxford University and a Professorial Fellow at Nuffield College, Oxford. He currently serves as co-editor for Comparative Political Studies. His research interests focus on the politics of education policy, the relationship between inequality and democracy, and the effects of asset price inflation on political preferences. He has published articles in leading journals such as the American Political Science Review, Comparative Political Studies, and World Politics. In addition to his articles and an edited volume, he has also published two books with Cambridge University Press, From the Ballot to the Blackboard: The Redistributive Political Economy of Education and Inequality and Democratization: An Elite-Competition Approach. More information can be found at his website and on his Google scholar profile.

Marijke Breuning

Marijke Breuning is Professor of Political Science at the University of North Texas. She is also an editor of the American Political Science Review. Her research focuses on foreign policy analysis, development cooperation, women/gender and politics, the politics of international children's rights, and the sociology of the profession. She has published in dozens of journals, such as the American Political Science Review, the American Journal of Political Science, Comparative Political Studies, and International Studies Quarterly. In addition to an edited volume, she has also published a book, Ethnopolitics in the New Europe, with Lynne Rienner, and a textbook, Foreign Policy Analysis: A Comparative Introduction, with Palgrave Macmillan. More information can be found at her website and on his Google scholar profile.

Guzmán Castro

Guzmán Castro is a doctoral candidate in the Political Science Department at the University of Pennsylvania. His dissertation explores the political and cultural history of the war on drugs in Latin America. His research interests include the rise of punitive-penal states in neoliberal Latin America, social movements, the dynamics and consequences of state violence in the Southern Cone since the 1960s, and the politics underneath the shifting boundaries of market (il)legality.


Anna Calasanti

Anna Calasanti is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Political Science at the University of New Mexico. Her research interests include political ethnography (with fieldwork experience in disadvantaged communities), the politics of abortion access, and comparative gender politics. Her work has been published in the Journal of Women, Politics, and Policy. More information can be found on her website.


Colin Elman

Colin Elman is Professor of Political Science and Director of the Center for Qualitative and Multi-Method Inquiry in the Maxwell School at Syracuse University. He is co-director of the Institute for Qualitative and Multi-Method Research (IQMR) and the Qualitative Data Repository. He is co-founder of the American Political Science Association’s International History and Politics Section and its Qualitative and Multi-Method Research Section. He also co-chaired the American Political Science Association’s committee on Data Access and Research Transparency (DA-RT). His research interests include international relations, national security, and qualitative methods. In addition to publishing in many of the discipline’s leading journals, he has also published several books and edited volumes. More information can be found at his website and on his Google scholar profile.

Lee Ann Fujii

Lee Ann Fujii is an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto in Canada. Her research interests include political violence, ethnicity and race, African politics, and field methods. Her articles have appeared in journals such as Perspectives on Politics, the Journal of Peace Research, and Qualitative Research. In addition, she has published a book, Killing Neighbors: Webs of Violence in Rwanda, with Cornell University Press. Her work has been funded by Canada’s Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, the United States Institute of Peace, the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, the National Council for Eurasian and East European Research, Fulbright, and the Russell Sage Foundation. More information can be found at her website.

Peter Hall

Peter A. Hall is Krupp Foundation Professor of European Studies in the Department of Government at Harvard University. He is also the Co-Director of the Program on Successful Societies for the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research. He is currently working on the methodology of political science, the political response to economic challenges in postwar Europe, and the impact of social institutions on inequalities in health. His work has appeared in many leading journals and edited volumes. In addition, he has also published a book, Governing the Economy: The Politics of State Intervention in Britain and France, with Oxford University Press. More information can be found at his website.

Mala Htun

Mala Htun is Professor of Political Science at the University of New Mexico. She conducts research on state actions to expand the opportunities of disadvantaged groups and the consequences for democratic politics and social equality. Her work appears in a variety of journals, including the American Political Science Review, Perspectives on Politics, and Politics & Gender. She has also published a book, Sex and the State: Abortion, Divorce, and the Family under Latin American Dictatorships and Democracies, with Cambridge University Press. Her second book, Inclusion Without Representation: Gender Quotas and Ethnic Reservations in Latin America was published with Cambridge University Press. More information can be found at her website and on her Google scholar profile.

John Ishiyama

John Ishiyama is Professor of Political Science at the University of North Texas. He is also lead editor of the American Political Science Review. His research focuses on democratization and political parties in post-communist Russian, European, Eurasian, and African (especially Ethiopian) politics, ethnic conflict and ethnic politics, and the scholarship of teaching and learning. He has published in dozens of journals, such as the American Political Science Review, Comparative Political Studies, Comparative Politics, and Party Politics. In addition to several edited volumes, he has also published a book, Ethnopolitics in the New Europe, with Lynne Rienner, and a textbook, Comparative Politics: Principles of Democracy and Democratization, with Wiley-Blackwell. More information can be found at his website and on his Google scholar profile.

Arthur Lupia

Arthur Lupia is Hal R. Varian Collegiate Professor of Political Science and a Research Professor in the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. He is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and an elected fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He co-chaired the American Political Science Association’s committee on Data Access and Research Transparency (DA-RT). He conducts research on various aspects of decision making and learning. In addition to publishing numerous articles across multiple disciplines, he has also published several books. His research has been supported by a wide range of groups, including the World Bank, the Public Policy Institute of California, the Markle Foundation, and the National Science Foundation. More information can be found at his website and on his Google scholar profile.

Marc Lynch

Marc Lynch is Professor of Political Science and International Affairs at George Washington University. His research interests include Middle East politics, Arab media and public opinion, Islamist movements, and public diplomacy. He has published numerous articles in journals such as Foreign Affairs, Security Studies, and the European Journal of International Relations. In addition to an edited volume, he has also published three books. One book, The Arab Uprising: The Unfinished Revolutions of the New Middle East, was published with Public Affairs. The other two, Voices of the New Arab Public: Iraq, Al Jazeera, and Middle East Politics Today and State Interests and Public Spheres: The International Politics of Jordan’s Identity, were both published with Columbia University Press. More information can be found at his website and on his Google scholar profile.

David Samuels

David Samuels is Distinguished McKnight University Professor of Political Science at the University of Minnesota. He currently serves as co-editor for Comparative Political Studies. His research interests include Brazilian and Latin American politics, US-Latin American relations, and democratization. His research has been published in all of the discipline’s leading journals. In addition to an edited volume and a textbook on comparative politics, he has also published three books with Cambridge University Press: Inequality and Democratization: An Elite-Competition Approach, Presidents, Parties, and Prime Ministers, and Ambition, Federalism, and Legislative Politics in Brazil. More information can be found at his website and on his Google scholar profile.

Rudra Sil

Rudra Sil is a Professor of Political Science and the SAS Director of the Huntsman Program in International Studies and Business at the University of Pennsylvania. His research interests include Russian/post-communist studies, Asian studies, labor politics, development studies, qualitative methodology, and the philosophy of the social sciences. His work has appeared in numerous journals, including Perspectives on Politics, the Journal of Theoretical Politics, International Studies Quarterly, and Studies in Comparative International Development. In addition to four edited volumes, he has also published two books. The first, Managing 'Modernity': Work, Community, and Authority in Late-Industrializing Japan and Russia, was published with the University of Michigan Press. The second, Beyond Paradigms: Analytic Eclecticism in the Study of World Politics, was coauthored with Peter Katzenstein and published with Palgrave. It was named a Choice Outstanding Academic Title in 2011. More information can be found at his website and on his Academia.edu profile.

Deborah Yashar

Deborah Yashar is Professor of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University and Director of Princeton’s Program in Latin American Studies (PLAS). She is editor of World Politics and co-director of the Project on Democracy & Development. Her research focuses on the intersection of democracy and citizenship, with publications on the origins and endurance of political regimes; the relationship between citizenship regimes, local autonomy, and ethnic politics; collective action and contentious politics; interest representation and party systems; and globalization. Her work has appeared in several leading journals and edited volumes. In addition, she has also published two books. The first, Demanding Democracy: Reform and Reaction in Costa Rica and Guatemala, was published with Stanford University Press. The second, Contesting Citizenship in Latin America: The Rise of Indigenous Movements and the Postliberal Challenge, was published with Cambridge University Press. More information can be found at her website.

Symposium: Politics of Space

Molly Ariotti

Molly Ariotti is a graduate student in the Department of Political Science at Pennsylvania State University. Her dissertation focuses on government composition, public goods provision, and bureaucratic capacity in Burkina Faso and Francophone Africa. Her research has been published in Political Analysis and on the Monkey Cage at The Washington Post. More information can be found at her website and on her Google scholar profile.

Charles Crabtree

Charles Crabtree is a graduate student in the Department of Political Science at Pennsylvania State University. His substantive research focuses on information manipulation (censorship and propaganda), authoritarian regimes, human rights, and post-Soviet politics. Methodologically, he is interested in causal inference, field experiments, and spatial analysis. His research has been published in the British Journal of Political Science, Electoral Studies, the Journal of Peace Research, PLOS ONE, and Research & Politics. More information can be found at his website and on his Google scholar profile.

Robert J. Franzese

Robert J. Franzese is a Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Michigan. He conducts research on the comparative and international political economy of developed democracies and related aspects of empirical methodology. In addition to publishing in many of the discipline’s leading journals, he has also published an edited volume and two books. His first book, Macroeconomic Policies of Developed Democracies, was published by Cambridge University Press. His second book, Modeling and Interpreting Interactive Hypotheses in Regression Analyses, was published by the University of Michigan Press. His research has been funded by the National Science Foundation. More information can be found at his website and on his Google scholar profile.

Jude C. Hayes

Jude C. Hays is an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Pittsburgh. He conducts research on the interconnections between domestic politics and the international economy. Methodologically, he is interested in spatial-temporal dependence in time-series-cross-sectional and panel data. In addition to publishing in many of the discipline’s leading journals, he has also published a book, Globalization and the New Politics of Embedded Liberalism, with Oxford University Press. More information can be found at his website and on his Google scholar profile.

Iris Hui

Iris Hui is the Associate Director of Academic Affairs at the Bill Lane Center for the American West at Stanford University. She conducts research on geography and politics, specifically on the causes and consequences of the uneven and mismatched spatial distribution of people and natural resources. She has published articles in journals such as Political Geography, the Economic Development Quarterly, and the Annals of the Association of American Geographers. More information can be found at her website and on her Google scholar profile.

Ron Johnston

Ron Johnston is a Professor of Geography at the University of Bristol in the United Kingdom and an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Human Geography at Macquarie University in Australia. His research interests include urban societal geography, human geography, and British elections. In addition to publishing numerous articles across several disciplines, he has also published a large number of books and edited volumes. More information can be found at his website and on his Google scholar profile.

Kelvyn Jones

Kelvyn Jones is a Professor of Quantitative Human Geography and the Head of the School of Geographical Sciences at the University of Bristol in the United Kingdom. His research focuses on the geography of health, research design, and complex modeling. In addition to publishing numerous articles across several disciplines, he has also published a wide range of books. More information can be found at his website and on his Google scholar profile.

David Manley

David Manley is a Senior Lecturer in Quantitative Geography at the University of Bristol in the United Kingdom. His research interests include neighborhood effects and segregation patterns. He has published articles in journals such as the Journal of Economic Geography, Social Science & Medicine, and Urban Studies. More information can be found at his website and on his Google scholar profile.

John O'Loughlin

John O'Loughlin is a Professor in the Department of Geography and a Faculty Research Associate in the Institute of Behavioral Science at the University of Colorado, Boulder. He is editor-in-chief of Political Geography and editor of Eurasian Geography and Economics. His research interests are in the spatial analysis of conflict and the political geography of the post-Soviet Union. He has published numerous articles in the discipline’s leading journals. In addition to his articles and edited volumes, he has also published several books. More information can be found at his website.

Charles Pattie

Charles Pattie is a Professor of Geography at the University of Sheffield in the United Kingdom. He conducts research on electoral geography and political participation. He has published articles in journals such as the American Political Science Review, the British Journal of Political Science, and Political Studies. In addition, he has published several books. More information can be found at his website and on his Google scholar profile.

Carina Schmitt

Carina Schmitt is an Associate Professor at the Research Center for Social Policy and Inequality (SOCIUM) at the University of Bremen in Germany. She has been a John F. Kennedy Memorial Fellow at the Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies at Harvard University. Her main research interest concerns the comparative, quantitative analysis of the emergence and development of social policy around the globe. She has published in journals such as World Politics, Comparative Political Studies, and the Journal of Public Policy. She has also published a book on The Political Economy of Privatization in Rich Democracies which is forthcoming with Oxford University Press. More information can be found at her website and on her Google scholar profile.

Dataset

Courtenay R. Conrad

Courtenay R. Conrad is an Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Merced. Her primary research and teaching interests include political violence, state repression, and human rights. The majority of her work focuses on how executives make decisions regarding repression in the face of institutional constraints. Her research has been published in the American Political Science Review, the American Journal of Political Science, and the Journal of Politics, among others. More information can be found at her website and on her Google scholar profile.

Will Moore

Will Moore is a Professor in the School of Politics & Global Studies and affiliated faculty with the Center on the Future of War at Arizona State University.  He is also a co-founder of the Conflict Consortium, an Editor / Contributor at Political Violence @ a Glance, and founder of the Citizen Media Evidence Partnership, C-MEP. His research focuses on dissident–state interactions: human rights, coercion, protest, rebellion, repression, and terror. In addition to numerous articles in leading journals, he has also published a book, A Mathematics Course for Political and Social Research, with Princeton University Press. More information can be found at his website and on his Google scholar profile.