Fall 2015 Contributors

Below you can find information on the contributors for the forthcoming Fall 2015 issue of the Newsletter. This issue will be available to members of APSA's Comparative Politics Section in Fall 2015 and to nonmembers in Spring 2016. Become a member today.

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Symposium: Training the Next Generation of Comparative Politics Scholars

James F. Adams

James F. Adams is a Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of California, Davis. He conducts research on political representation, voting behavior, and parties' election strategies in Western Europe and the United States. His research has been published in all of the discipline's leading journals. In addition, he has published two books. The first, Party Competition and Responsible Party Government, was published by the University of Michigan Press. The second, A Unified Theory of Party Competition, was published by Cambridge University Press. In 2012 he received the Outstanding Mentor Award from the Consortium for Women in Research at the University of California, Davis. More information can be found on his website.

Kanchan Chandra

Kanchan Chandra is a Professor in the Department of Politics at New York University. She has been a Carnegie Fellow, a Guggenheim Foundation Fellow, a Russell Sage Foundation Fellow, a Fellow at the Princeton Program on Democracy and Development, and a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University. She conducts research on comparative ethnic politics, democratic theory, political parties and elections, and violence. She has published articles in journals such as the Annual Review of Political Science, Comparative Political Studies, and Electoral Studies. In addition, she has published two books. The first, Why Ethnic Parties Succeed: Patronage and Ethnic Headcounts in India, was published by Cambridge University Press. The second, Constructivist Theories of Ethnic Politics, was published by Oxford University Press. Her research has been funded by the National Science Foundation and the United States Institute of Peace. More information can be found on her website.

Barbara Geddes

Barbara Geddes is a Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of California, Los Angeles. Her current research focuses on dictatorships and regime transitions. Her research has been published in all of the discipline's leading journals. In addition, she has published two books. The first, Politician's Dilemma: Building State Capacity in Latin America, was published by the University of California Press. The second, Paradigms and Sand Castles: Theory Building and Research Design in Comparative Politics, was published by the University of Michigan Press. She has a third book, How Dictatorships Work (with Joseph Wright and Erica Frantz), nearing completion. Her research has been funded by the Department of Defense's Minerva Initiative, and the National Science Foundation. In 2014, she won the G. Bingham Powell Graduate Mentoring Award given by the Comparative Politics Organized Section of the American Political Science Association. More information can be found on her website.

Scott Gehlbach

Scott Gehlbach is a Professor of Political Science in the Department of Political Science at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He has been a Visiting Professor in the Department of Government at Harvard University, a Senior Research Fellow at the International Center for the Study of Institutions and Development at the Higher School of Economics (Russia), and a Visiting Scholar at the Centre for Economic and Financial Research at the New Economic School (Russia). He conducts research on economic reform, autocracy, political connections, and other important topics in political economy. His research has been published in all of the discipline's leading journals. In addition, he has published two books - Representation through Taxation: Revenue, Politics, and Development in Postcommunist States and Formal Models of Domestic Politics - with Cambridge University Press. More information can be found on his website.

Gretchen Helmke

Gretchen Helmke is an Associate Professor and Chair in the Department of Political Science at the University of Rochester. She has been a Visiting Fellow at the Kellogg Institute for International Studies at the University of Notre Dame, a Harvard Academy Scholar at the Weatherhead Center for International and Area Studies at Harvard University, and a Visiting Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. Her general research interests include comparative political institutions, democratization, law and courts, and Latin American politics. Her research has appeared in several of the discipline's leading journals. In addition, she has published several books, including Courts Under Constraints: Judges, Generals, and Presidents in Argentina, 2005; Informal Institutions and Democracy: Lessons from Latin America, (co-edited with Steven Levitsky), 2006; and Courts in Latin America (co-edited with Julio Ríos Figueroa), 2011. Her fourth book, Institutions on the Edge: The Origins and Consequences of Institutional Instability in Latin America, is forthcoming with Cambridge University Press. More information can be found on her website and on her Google scholar profile.

G. Bingham Powell, Jr.

G. Bingham Powell, Jr. is the Marie C. Wilson and Joseph C. Wilson Professor of Political Science in the Department of Political Science at the University of Rochester. He conducts research on problems of political representation in different electoral, party, and policymaking systems. His research has been published in all of the discipline's leading journals. In addition, he has published six books. The first, Social Fragmentation and Political Hostility, was published by Stanford University Press. The second, Contemporary Democracies: Participation, Stability and Violence, was published by Harvard University Press. The third, Elections as Instruments of Democracy: Majoritarian and Proportional Visions, was published by Yale University Press. In addition to these books, he has published a popular undergraduate textbook, Comparative Politics Today: A World View, now in its 11th edition and two graduate-level texts, Comparative Politics: A Developmental Approach and Comparative Politics: System, Process and Policy. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and has served as president of the American Political Science Association and as Editor of the American Political Science Review. His research has been funded by the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Science Foundation, and the Social Science Research Council. More information can be found at his website and on his Google scholar profile.

Jeffrey K. Staton

Jeffrey K. Staton is an Associate Professor and Winship Distinguished Research Professor in the Department of Political Science at Emory University. He has been a post-doctoral fellow at the New York University School of Law and at the Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies at the University of California, San Diego. His general research interests include judicial politics, especially in Latin America. He has published articles in journals such as the American Journal of Political Science, the Journal of Politics, and Comparative Political Studies. In addition, he has published a book, Judicial Power and Strategic Communication in Mexico, with Cambridge University Press. His research has been funded by the National Science Foundation. More information can be found on his website and on his Google scholar profile.

Leonard Wantchekon

Leonard Wantchekon is a Professor in the Department of Politics and the Woodrow Wilson School and Associate Faculty the Department of Economics at Princeton University. He conducts research on political and economic development, particularly in Africa, and his specific interests include topics such as democratization, clientelism and redistributive politics, the resource curse, and the long-term social impact of historical events. He has published articles in journals such as the American Economic Review, the American Political Science Review, the Journal of Politics, and the Quarterly Journal of Economics. In addition, he has published two books. His first book, New Advances in Experimental Research on Corruption, is published with Emerald Books. His second book, Rêver à Contre-Courant: Autobiographie, is published with Edition L'Harmattan, Paris and is an autobiography describing his journey from political prisoner in Benin to Ivy League professor in the United States. In addition to being a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a core partner director of the Afrobarometer Network, he is also the founder of the Institute for Empirical Research in Political Economy in Cotonou, Benin and the Africa School of Economics in Abomey Calav, Benin. More information can be found on his website and on his Google scholar profile.

Elisabeth Jean Wood

Elisabeth Jean Wood is a Professor of Political Science, as well as International and Area Studies, at Yale University and a member of the External Faculty of the Santa Fe Institute. Her general research interests include collective action, civil wars, and sexual violence. In addition to numerous articles and edited volumes, she has published two books. Both books, Forging Democracy from Below: Insurgent Transitions in South Africa and El Salvador and Insurgent Collective Action and Civil War in El Salvador, were published by Cambridge University Press. She is currently working on two new books, Sexual Violence during War and Patterns of Violence against Civilians in Colombia’s Civil War (with Francisco Gutiérrez Sanín). In 2013 she received the Graduate Mentor Award for the Social Sciences at Yale University. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and her research has been funded by the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation and the United States Institute of Peace. More information can be found on her website.

Special Topic: Ukraine and Comparative Politics

Mark R. Beissinger

Mark R. Beissinger is the Henry W. Putnam Professor of Politics at Princeton and Director of the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies (PIIRS). In addition to numerous articles and book chapters, Beissinger is author or editor of five books, including most recently Historical Legacies of Communism in Russia and Eastern Europe (Cambridge University Press, 2014). His book Nationalist Mobilization and the Collapse of the Soviet State (Cambridge University Press, 2002) received multiple awards, including the Woodrow Wilson Foundation Award presented by the American Political Science Association for the best book published in the United States in the field of government, politics, or international affairs. Recent writings have dealt with such topics as individual participation in the Orange Revolution in Ukraine in 2004 and in the Egyptian and Tunisian revolutions in 2011, the impact of new social media on opposition movements in autocratic regimes, Russian imperialism in Eurasia, how to think about an historical legacy, the relationship between nationalism and democracy, and the evolving character of revolutions over the last century.

Erik S. Herron

Erik S. Herron is the Eberly Family Professor of Political Science at West Virginia University and a former Program Director at the National Science Foundation. His research focuses on political institutions, especially electoral systems. He has been a Fulbright scholar in Ukraine and has served on eleven election observation missions in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. In addition to publishing in leading journals, such as the American Journal of Political Science, the Journal of Politics, and World Politics, he has also published two books: Mixed Electoral Systems: Contamination and its Consequences (with Federico Ferrara and Misa Nishikawa) and Elections and Democracy after Communism? In late 2014, he put several surveys into the field in Ukraine to examine state capacity through the lens of election administration. More information can be found on his website and on his Google scholar profile.

Maria Popova

Maria Popova is an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at McGill University and a faculty associate of the European Union Center of Excellence and the Institute for the Study of International Development. She received her Ph.D. in 2006 from Harvard University. Her research focuses on the state of the rule of law in the post-Communist region. Her research has been published in Comparative Political Studies, Demokratizatsiya, and Europe-Asia Studies. In addition, she has published a book, Politicized Justice in Emerging Democracies, with Cambridge University Press. Her research has been funded by the Fonds de Recherche du Québec - Société et Culture and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. More information can be found on her website and on her Google scholar profile.

Oxana Shevel

Oxana Shevel is an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at Tufts University. She is also a member of the EUDO Citizenship expert group as a country expert on Ukraine, a member of the Program on New Approaches to Research and Security in Eurasia (PONARS Eurasia) scholarly network, and an Associate at the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies and the Ukrainian Research Institute at Harvard University. She received her Ph.D. in 2003 from Harvard University. Her research focuses on the post-Communist region surrounding Russia and on issues such as nation- and state-building, the politics of citizenship and migration, the politics of memory, and the influence of international institutions on democratization. Her research has been published in Comparative Politics, Political Science Quarterly, and Post-Soviet Affairs, among others. In addition, she has published an award-winning book, Migration, Refugee Policy, and State Building in Postcommunist Europe, with Cambridge University Press. More information can be found on her website and on her Google scholar profile.

Dataset: Archigos

The Archigos dataset contains information on the date and manner of entry and exit of over 3,000 leaders from 1875 - 2004 as well as their gender, birth- and death-date, previous times in office and their post-exit fate.

Hein Goemans

Hein Goemans is an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Rochester. Before coming to Rochester, he was an Assistant Professor at Duke University, a Visiting Professor at Stanford University, and a National Security Fellow at Harvard University. He received his Ph.D. in 1995 from the University of Chicago. His current research interests include attachment and claims to territory, and their impact on international relations. His research has been published in many of the discipline’s leading journals, including the American Journal of Political Science, the American Political Science Review, and the Journal of Politics. He has also published two books. The first, War and Punishment, was published by Princeton University Press. The second, Leaders and International Conflict, was published by Cambridge University Press. More information can be found at his website.