Editorial Team

Editors

Matt Golder

Matt Golder is an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at The Pennsylvania State University. He received his Ph.D. in 2004 from New York University. His research looks at how political institutions affect democratic representation. In addition to articles in leading journals, such as the American Journal of Political Science, the Annual Review of Political Science, the British Journal of Political Science, the Journal of Politics, and Political Analysis, he has also published a textbook on comparative politics, Principles of Comparative Politics. He is currently working on two research projects. The first looks at negative campaigning in a multi-party context, while the second involves a book manuscript on interaction models. In addition to serving as chair of APSA's section on Representation and Electoral Systems (2011-2013), he is also a member of the executive board for the Making Electoral Democracy Work project led by André Blais at the University of Montreal and the advisory board for the Electoral Integrity Project led by Pippa Norris at Harvard University. More information can be found at his website and on his Google scholar profile.


Sona N. Golder

Sona Golder is an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at The Pennsylvania State University. She is also an editor at the British Journal of Political Science. She received her Ph.D. in 2004 from New York University. She studies political institutions, with a particular interest in coalition formation. In addition to publishing two books, The Logic of Pre-Electoral Coalition Formation and Principles of Comparative Politics, she has also published in many of the discipline's leading journals, including the American Journal of Political Science, the British Journal of Political Science, the Journal of Politics, and Political Analysis. She is currently completing a third book project, Multi-Level Electoral Politics, with Oxford University Press. She is involved in the women in methods group - she was the organizer and host for the 4th Annual Visions in Methodology (VIM) Conference, she has served as a VIM mentor for female graduate students and junior faculty, and she was a member of the diversity committee for APSA's Political Methodology Section. More information can be found at her website and on her Google scholar profile.

Editorial Assistants

Charles Crabtree

Charles Crabtree is a graduate student in the Department of Political Science at University of Michigan. He is interested in censorship and propaganda, authoritarian regimes, and human rights. Having lived in Minsk, Belarus, for two years, he also has an interest in post-Soviet politics. He is currently conducting field experiments to study political repression, private censorship, and information control in Belarus, Russia, and China. His research has been published or is forthcoming at the British Journal of Political Science, Electoral Studies, International Studies Quarterly, the Journal of Experimental Political Science, the Journal of Open Source Software, the Journal of Peace Research, Personality and Individual Differences, PLOS ONE, Research & Politics, and Sociological Science. His research has been funded by the Making Electoral Democracy Work project and the Swedish Research Council. He co-organizes the Virtual Workshop on Authoritarian Regimes. More information can be found at his website and on his Google scholar profile.


Yaoyao Dai

Yaoyao Dai is a graduate student in the Department of Political Science at The Pennsylvania State University. Her research focuses on authoritarian regimes, anti-corruption campaigns, and information manipulation (media, propaganda, and censorship), with a particular emphasis on China. She is currently conducting an online survey experiment to examine the effect of anti-corruption campaigns on regime support in China. Her research has been published in the Journal of Chinese Academy of Governance. More information can be found at her website.

Editorial Board

Molly Ariotti

Molly Ariotti is a graduate student in the Department of Political Science at The Pennsylvania State University. Her research focuses on African politics, with a particular emphasis on Francophone Africa. Her dissertation examines government composition, public goods provision, and bureaucratic capacity. She has lived and worked in France, and conducted field work in Ouagadougou and Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso, and Dakar, Senegal. She was recently awarded a 2016 National Security Education Program David L. Boren Fellowship. Her work has been published in Political Analysis and on The Monkey Cage at The Washington Post. More information can be found at her website and on her Google scholar profile.


Xun Cao

Xun Cao is an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at The Pennsylvania State University. Before Penn State, he was a post-doctoral fellow at the Niehaus Center of the Woodrow Wilson School of the Princeton University and a lecturer in the Department of Government at the University of Essex in the United Kingdom. He received his Ph.D. in 2007 from the University of Washington. His general research interests include international and comparative political economy, environmental and energy politics, network analysis, and spatial models. He has published in the discipline's leading journals, including American Journal of Political Science, British Journal of Political Science, International Organization, Journal of Politics, and World Politics. His current research projects examine climate change and conflict in Africa, within-country pollution patterns using GIS data, climate change and energy policies in China, and ethnic violence in the Xinjiang region of China. More information can be found at this website and on his Google scholar profile.


Elizabeth C. Carlson

Elizabeth C. Carlson is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science and the Program on African Studies at The Pennsylvania State University. She received her Ph.D. in 2011 from the University of California, Los Angeles and has held pre- and post-doctoral fellowships at Stanford and Yale. She uses survey and experimental methods to study political behavior and citizen preferences in new African democracies, as well as how citizen behavior shapes government performance and accountability. Her research has been published in World Politics, Political Behavior, Political Opinion Quarterly, and the Quarterly Journal of Political Science. Her work has been funded by the National Science Foundation, and she is a member of Experiments in Governance and Politics. More information can be found at her website and on her Google scholar profile.


Kostanca Dhima

Kostanca is a graduate student in the Department of Political Science at Texas A&M. In her dissertation, Kostanca uses a series of online voting experiments to examine how electoral rules and intersectional identities (gender and race) affect substantive and descriptive representation. She also examines demand-side and supply-side explanations for women’s legislative representation in a global perspective. She has lived and worked in Albania. More information can be found at her website.



Amanda Fidalgo

Amanda Fidalgo is a graduate student in the Department of Political Science at The Pennsylvania State University. Her research interests include federalism, subnational authoritarianism, and public opinion about local government. Her research has been published in the Quarterly Journal of Political Science. In 2012 she received a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship. She is currently working on a research project focusing on the impact of partisanship on individual assessments of local and national government in Brazil. More information can be found at her website.



Joseph Wright

Joseph Wright is an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at The Pennsylvania State University. He currently holds the Jeffrey L. and Sharon D. Hyde Early Career Professorship. He received his Ph.D. in 2007 from the University of California, Los Angeles. Prior to arriving in State College, he was a post-doctoral research associate at Princeton University and a visiting faculty fellow at the University of Notre Dame. He studies comparative political economy with a particular interest in how international factors — such as foreign aid, economic sanctions, human rights prosecutions, and remittances — influence domestic politics in autocratic regimes. His research has been published or is forthcoming in the American Journal of Political Science, the Annual Review of Political Science, the British Journal of Political Science, International Organization, and the Journal of Politics. His research has been funded by the National Science Foundation and the Minerva Research Initiative. More information can be found at his website and on his Google scholar profile.


Vineeta Yadav

Vineeta Yadav is an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at The Pennsylvania State University. She received her Ph.D. in 2007 from Yale University. Her research focuses on the effects of institutions on economic development, with a particular emphasis on how institutions influence lobbying, corruption, and judicial empowerment. In addition to several articles, she has also published three books. The first, Political Parties, Business Groups, and Corruption in Developing Countries was published by Oxford University Press in 2011. It received the 2012 Best Book award from APSA’s Political Parties and Organizations Section, the 2011 Rosenthal Book Award from the APSA’s Legislative Studies Section, and an Honorable Mention for the 2012 Best Book award from the APSA’s Comparative Democratization Section. Her second book, Democracy, Electoral Systems and Judicial Empowerment in Developing Countries, was published in 2014 with University of Michigan Press. Her third book, Corruption in Dictatorships, was published with Cambridge University Press. She is currently working on two new research projects. The first examines the origins of commercial courts and their effect on economic development and civic rights. The second looks at how the evolution of political learning and support influences institution building and democratic consolidation. More information can be found at her website and on her Google scholar profile.